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Alleged surgical mistake leads to impaired speech, other issues

On behalf of Izzo Law Office posted in Surgical Errors on Wednesday, December 3, 2014.

Everyone in New York understands that mistakes can happen at any time. In some cases, mistakes are simple and easily rectified, while, in others, mistakes are serious and could cause years of pain and suffering for an unfortunate individual. This is particularly true when it comes to health care. The potential impact of a medical mistake is one of the reasons why medical professionals are required to have years of education and extensive training before they are allowed to provide medical care. Unfortunately, even with a decade of learning and training, a surgical mistake can occur and cause a person a lifetime of pain.

In the spring of 2013, a man underwent a surgical procedure. During the procedure, a carotid endarterectomy, the surgeon reportedly cut one of his nerves. The nerve that was severed was the nerve that controls the mouth’s movement.

The man says that he has been through extensive treatment due to the complications that stemmed from the alleged botched surgery. The surgical mistake has reportedly caused him numerous issues that have impacted his daily life. Two of the issues listed in his lawsuit include difficulty swallowing and impaired speech.

When a surgical mistake leads to the injury of a patient, it may be possible for the patient, or his or her family, to pursue a medical malpractice claim. In such a claim, patients who have been negligently injured at the hands of a medical professional may be able to seek financial compensation for physical pain and suffering, loss of function, mental anguish, lost wages, medical costs and other related damages. The most important thing for individuals in New York to understand is that they have legal rights that deserve protection after receiving substandard care from a health care provider.

Source:¬†cookcountyrecord.com, “Patient accuses surgeon of severing nerve that controls mouth movement“, Ashley Perry, Nov. 24, 2014